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Maddie A
over 6 months ago

#teensummerjobs

Yes, winter is here, but hiring for summer jobs starts now.

Dive right in and start looking for opportunities – many employers who hire for the summer have already started looking, and they’re usually all staffed up by March.

How to start

A good way to kick off the job search is to have an idea of positions that interest you. Industries that rely heavily on summer workers include:

  • Food Service (barista, food prep, waiters, hosting, bussing)
  • Retail (sales associates, cashiers, stocking, inventory)
  • Outdoor work (farm hand, animal care, crop oversight, greenhouse maintenance)
  • Stock clerks and order fulfillment
  • Childcare work (babysitting, camp counselor, tutoring)
  • Domestic (dog walking, personal assistant)
  • Recreational (theme parks, resorts, lifeguarding, swim lessons)

Our community of Jobcasers have great insights and tips about the teen summer job search! Check out what these members are saying and jump into the discussion: Nicole Christina Marcus

Bottom line: get ahead of the game and start job searching now...your summer self will thank you.

Check back tomorrow for the next piece in our #teensummerjobs series: how to make sure your applications and resumes end up in the right place.

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Maddie A
over 6 months ago

#teensummerjobs

It’s a common (and a good!) question, and it’s best to know the answer before tax day–April 15–rolls around.

The short answer It’s not a question of how old you are, it’s a question of how much you make.

The long answer If you are a minor (under 18 years old) and your earned income was over $6,350 in 2017, you will need to file a tax return.

In the world of taxes, minors are (under 18 years old), considered “dependents” and are in a lower tax bracket than adults. The reason is quite simple: minors are likely students and are therefore not expected to make as much money as their parents or guardians.

Am I a “dependent?” If you are one of the following, you are considered a “dependent” by the IRS (Internal Revenue Service): • Under 19 years old • A full-time student under 24 years old • Your parent or guardian provides financial support that is equal to or greater than half of your annual income.

“Unofficial” jobs count! Babysitting, lawn mowing, dog walking, snow shoveling...if you’ve filled one of these roles or any similar roles, you’re considered “self-employed” by the IRS. And if you made more than $6,350 as a self-employed worker in 2017, you’ll need to file.

I need to file. Now what? Time to fill out forms. Yay!

First of all, memorize your social security number...all of these forms will require it.

If you are self-employed, you'll fill out Form 1040EZ and Schedule SE (self-employment). If you’re employed by a business, your employer will provide you with a W-2 form. • More info on Form 1040EZ here • More info on Schedule SE self-employment here

If you’re not likely to make more than $6,350 working this summer (or even this year in total), consider filling out a W-4 form anyway (more info on the W-4 form here). W-4s determine how much of your income employers will withhold from your paycheck. If you don’t fill it out, they are required to withhold at the highest rate, so completing the form will will ensure you keep as much of your earnings as legally possible. (More info on filling out a W-4 as a minor here.)

Resources Visit these pages for more helpful information. • How to File as a DependentTax Rules for Children and DependentsMinimum Income Requirements for Filing a Tax ReturnHow Many Hours is “Full-Time” Employment?How to File ElectronicallyHelpful Government Resources

Too long, didn’t read Long story short: stay on top of this stuff! Get all your ducks in a row before April 15. Tally up your earned income for 2017 and determine if you need to file, and if you do, refer to the information and resources above to ensure you do so correctly.

If you need additional help, consider visiting your school’s guidance department–they can give you more detailed guidance and help answer any specific questions you may have.

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Matt Greenwood
over 6 months ago

I am 16 and just got my first job working at pizza hut. Its good for now plus I get discounts on pizza so that's cool. If you want to get a job too make a resume. Don;t know how? Google resume templates teen and use some of the ideas to help make yours. It's really easy. Then drop it off at the job u want. You HAVE to go in! Ask for the manager and act happy while you tell them who u are, and then hand them your resume. Trust me it works! Call back in a few days to check in with them. If you don’t do anything then it won’t happen.

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Ashley Wilson
over 6 months ago

If you’re a teenager and looking for a job, it can feel VERY frustrating when you need income but you’re still young and/or inexperienced. So, let’s check out some jobs that might be a perfect fit for you! If you are under 18 please know that some jobs might require [working papers] (https://www.thebalance.com/working-papers-employment-age-certificates-2063908).

[Babysitting, pet care, tutoring] (https://www.care.com/) Under 18? Care.com allows to to make your own parent monitored account. You can also create a profile for each different type of job that you are interested in!

[21 job ideas for students] (https://www.localwise.com/a/137-21-best-part-time-jobs-for-teens-and-high-school-students) Still in school? Here are 21 part time jobs to consider. Search for some of them [here] (https://www.jobcase.com/jobs/search)!

[Hire Teen] (https://www.hireteen.com/) A great resource to check out! This site lists jobs you can apply to based on your age.

[Create your very first resume] (https://www.jobcase.com/conversations/5128e10e-141e-5382-a8e7-74a5f06150b8) Here is some information on the best ways to create a resume when you don’t have a lot of experience. Yes, teens need resumes too! : )

Just remember that with any job you apply to make sure to stay safe, notify a friend or relative of when you have an interview/begin work, and don’t get frustrated if some businesses tell you no.

Push through it and keep going! Your job is waiting for you.

Know a teen OR are you a parent to one? Share this info with them! : )

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Tricia Hendrix
Community Specialist
Community Specialist
over 6 months ago

Typhoon Texas Waterpark located near Roundrock, Texas will host an in-person job fair for seasonal positions THIS SATURDAY, April 10 from 10 a.m.-3 p.m.

Positions include food and beverage, front gate, in-park events, lifeguard and others. No appointment or pre-registration is necessary.

Applicants age 16 and older should come with resumes to Typhoon Texas, located at 18500 N. SH 130, Pflugerville and wear a mask at the event!

Applications can also be submitted online at the Typhoon Texas website.

#teens #Roundrock #Texas #hiringnews #hiringevent #jobfair #jobsearch

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Lawrence White
Community Specialist
Community Specialist
over 6 months ago

#NationWideUSA - Cedar Point announced it plans to hire approximately 6,500 associates for the 2021 season and will be hosting in-person and virtual National Hiring Day - Saturday, March 13 events.

Register for a Hiring Event near you at Cedar Point National Hiring Day

  • Applicants need to be 18 years of age and older to qualify for employment.

Job Areas Include:

  • Hospitality
  • Food & Beverage
  • Aquatics
  • Maintenance
  • Seasonal (#2021SummerJobs)

Why Cedar Point?

  • Get Real-World Experience In How Our Business Operates.
  • Develop Skills That Look Good On A Resume Or Application.
  • Interact With Different People Of All Ages And Backgrounds.
  • Learn About Cash Handling, Inventory, Customer Service, * Food Preparation, Safety And Much, Much More.

Attend a local hiring event to learn more about Cedar Point job roles and immediate hiring opportunities. Register today at Cedar Point National Hiring Day

Job Search and Application Tips:

#CedarPoint #hiringnews #jobsearch #teens #fulltime #parttime #seasonal #NationWideUSA

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Lawrence White
Community Specialist
Community Specialist
over 6 months ago

Marquette County, MI - The Michigan DNR Parks and Recreation Division just announced plans to hire up to 1,200 seasonal park workers and more than 50 seasonal park rangers to help deliver memory-making outdoor experiences at state parks, state forest campgrounds, harbors and other DNR-managed recreation facilities throughout spring, summer and fall.

Workers earn between $10 and $11.60 an hour and may qualify for academic/internship credit. Park rangers receive state employment benefits and are paid between $17.75 and $24.95 an hour. - DNR Parks and Recreation Division Careers

To learn more about these opportunities and other openings throughout the department go to https://www.michigan.gov

Are you a teen or minor workers looking for summer employment with no previous work experience? Check out Teens: land a job by creating a resume! and No experience? You can still land a job right now! for quick tips and suggestions designed to help you get hired!

#2021Summerjobs #teens #seasonal #fulltime #parttime #park&recreation #Michigan #MidWest

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Lawrence White
Community Specialist
Community Specialist
over 6 months ago

Illinois - Six Flags parks in Illinois just announced their hiring initiative for #2021SummerJobs. Application are now being accepted for Ride Operators, Food & Beverage, Aquatics, Security, Customer Service, and more!

Six Flags parks are now being accepted for the 2021 Season. Apply online today!

Teen Application Tips - Teens: land a job by creating a resume!

https://www.sixflags.com

#2021SummerJobs #sixflags #teens #amusement #entertainment #hospitality #hiringnews #jobsearch #fulltime #parttime #Illinois #MidWest

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Maddie A
over 6 months ago

#teensummerjobs #internships #teenjobs #jobsearch #advice #teens #highschool

Don’t dismiss the idea of high school internships until you’ve got the facts.

First, let’s bust a few myths:

1) Internships aren’t just for recent grads and college students 2) Not all of them are unpaid 3) It’s not just getting coffee, making copies, and being the office errand-runner

Now that we’ve cleared that up, keep in mind that timing is everything. March and April are prime application time for summer internships.! Read on for facts, tips and resources to help you decide if an internship is right for you, and how to get started.

Types of internships The best internship options for high schoolers are: paid, unpaid, for-credit and not-for-credit. Though each one varies, they’re similar in that they all help with early stage career-building, look great on college applications, help you make industry connections, are a chance to lock down high-level references and referrals, and ultimately, can lead to a permanent job.

Paid: Don’t expect to be rolling in dough, but do expect to be rich with experience. • US Secret ServiceGeoSciences Bridge ProgramMicrosoftGoogle

Unpaid: Same idea as a paid internship, but make sure you are getting a fair payoff of exposure, learning, and networking opportunities. • Harvard Summer Program for High School StudentsStanford University Research ProgramWedding & Event PlanningEnvironmental Protection Agency

For-Credit: Many high schools and colleges offer internship programs in exchange for school credit. The idea is to help you work toward graduation, and once you have your degree, you’ll have that much more experience in your field! Many of these internships can also be done for non-credit. Not-For-Credit internships are usually for students who do not need any additional credit on their transcripts, but want more practical experience. (Note: these are traditionally for college-bound students or college students, but you can still keep an eye out to see if they can be obtained while in high school) • EngineeringTechnical InternCreative ServicesDigital MediaLegal Justice

Benefits We already busted the myth that interns live to serve coffee, run errands and make copies. What you can expect is behind-the-scenes access to action that’s usually reserved for seasoned professionals. It’s a great way to “try on” an industry, business, or career before taking the plunge for real.

Some more benefits of internships: • Work experience trumps any and all coursework or volunteering...it’s a great resume booster. • Automatic references and referrals • Network connections and contacts • RELEVANT WORK EXPERIENCE! A student internship is a rare opportunity to obtain actual work credit, which will make you stand out against other high schoolers with no work experience and increase your chances of landing a job.

SIDE NOTE: This kind of “career exploration” isn’t exclusive to only students who plan to go to college. Apprenticeships are a great way for vocational school students or trade workers to gain practical hands-on experience and training in a specialized field.

Resources Now that you know the types of internships and how they’re beneficial, here’s some info compiled to help you find – and land – your 2018 summer internship. • 15 Awesome Internships for High School StudentsSummer 2018 Internships Search6 Reasons To Do An InternshipCareer Advice: Why Internships Rock15 Ways to Stand Out As An InternNASA Internships

AND, don’t miss these tips straight from the Jobcase Jobready Kit to help you get in tip-top internship shape: • How to use the Jobcase resume generatorJobcase Jobready ChecklistThe small stuff matters! How & why you should add it to your Jobcase profile

High school is not too early to start thinking ahead, and an internship is just that: an investment or in your future.

So, overall, think of an internship as a unique chance to “test drive” and explore an interest. No contracts signed, no long-term commitments. It’s less about making money and more about getting hands on, in your face, real-world experience.

What are some reasons you would consider an internship? What kind of internship interests you, and why?

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Penelope Calderon
over 6 months ago

During my senior year of high school and my freshman year of college, I worked for McDonald's. I did it all. I took orders and worked the cash register and drive-thru (when we actually had to figure out the change ourselves). My oldest teenage son is now at that same moment where he wants a job. So here’s what I think. If your teen wants to work to save up for his own car or something worthwhile and there is an available job at a fast-food restaurant, you should consider letting him/her take the job. I learned a lot from working at McDonald's and it helped me form a strong work ethic in each of my future jobs. I know fast food gets a bad rap, but for me, I think it's definitely good to have your kids know the value of hard work and earning money. What do you think?

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