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Tabitha Todd
over 6 months ago

This is a story about my work from home scam situation. They claim to be a "work from home" company, a representative named Libby Sartain (yes the professional author) they are using her name and info as the "hiring manager" you go through an #interview process it seems so legit, well it came down to them asking to send me a check to purchase the product in order to do the job. I said ok, she then emails me a check for $1900 in my name right then and there I knew it was fraud, she was so adamant about me using mobile deposit or even just cashing the check. so once I called her out she started calling me a criminal and demanding I return the money, when I told her I didn't even cash the said check because its fake as hell she went all crazy on me. lol just keep an eye out and be careful anyone wanting to send you money upfront is usually trying to steal your account info.

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Laura Powers
23 days ago

There is a job called Mail Processor - Postal service DO NOT APPLY!!! This is a very realistic scam, they ask all the right questions and their website looks very realistic. They ask for your bank info at the end and if you give it to them they will take $89.00 #scam #customerservice

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Michael Carvalho
2 months ago

What Keeps People Applying? I will never understand why people will keep applying or leaving themselves vulnerable to being SCAMMED?

I have posted several times Signs to Be Aware of when searching for Employment in the Community, yet people are still applying to these Scam Jobs. First and Foremost, I get it, you would like to find a good paying jobs. High Pay, and Work Schedules that fit your lifestyle. Let’s face it, chances of it happening are slim but reachable. It starts with putting in the effort to obtain it. The old saying is If it Sounds To Good to be True, normally it’s a Scam! Let me share with you a story of what happened to a person I know and worked with at the hospital. Each morning we would walk into work together and chat. She told me she was quitting her job. She said she received a job offer paying $27.00 per hour, weekends off & holidays off with pay. Right away the flags went up in my head that it was a Scam. I started to explain to her how it’s sounds funny. She got mad at me, and said “I Thought you would be happy for me”? I tried to explain I am, but still worried it was a scam. I didn’t hear from her No More. She quit and walked out. A few weeks later, I ran into her at the Union Hall and asked How she was doing in her New Job? I could see the disappointment in her face. She told me she had been scammed for a lot of money. They wiped out her bank accounts, ruined her credit and had to move. She was applying for her old job again. Don’t allow this to happen to you. Research the jobs you are applying for and make sure they are real. What Company ask you to join What’s app? Lately, I am sure you noticed the post right here in the community. Several Post Per Day, offering Office Assistants, and others. They ask you to email them or message? They are signs of being scammed. #scammed #scam

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patticakes Roscoe
2 months ago

Be careful ! Sent my information for a job working and it was a scam asking me for money so sad people now a days be careful on this site #scam

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Michael Carvalho
5 months ago

Over the past few weeks, I noticed a lot of Scams being Posted in the Community. This is at an alarming rate. Taking a look back from a few weeks ago, the hottest topic is WFH jobs being posted by strangers in the community. As you might have read I posted Scam Alert Information for all to read. Here are a few things that I was told by people I have talked to this past week.

This lady who I will call Carol recently applied for a WFH position with a Scammer. Not knowing it was a scam she agreed to provide her personal information to the person. Thinking she had a great job paying $26.10 per hour, she told her friends about it. A few of them applied too! Before they knew it, they were receiving calls from all sorts of creditors saying they needed more information. One of her friends lost her life savings.

Another one was A.K.A. Robert, he told me that he was recently hired by a company to Drop Ship Packages from his home. They provide all the necessary materials to do it from his home. The Company agreed to send him a check for $3200.00 up front. He was to cash the check and purchase a computer, shipping materials and if they was extra cash he would wire it back to the company. That following day, Robert received an FedEx delivery with the check for $3200.00 and cashed it from his bank account. He purchased a computer and shipping supplies. After purchasing what he thought he needed he had $1900.00 left over and called the Scammer to inform him that he had the $1900.00. The Scammer told him to keep $500.00 for being honest and Western Union the rest back. He did! A few days later the check he received bounced and the bank removed the $3200.00 from his account. He filed a police report!

Don’t let this happen to you, follow the rules and remember if it sounds to good to be true it is a Scam! #WFH #Scam

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Posted to #jobsearch
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Kelson Copeland
3 months ago

before even my first shift I let them know my situation which was I didn’t really have a place to stay etc and if I could get a hotel because I was in Fort Wayne and my store was 38 minutes from my temporary location. So I got ignored on that email but made my own way. My first week I got a finger infection and had to go to the ER and get antibiotics for it but cool whatever. So the second week I was staying in a hotel across the street from my store and I had a payment arrangement with the front desk people previously and everything was smooth since my checks wouldve started coming in and I was supposed to stay there until June. Well the hotel owners came and completely kicked me out of my room with all my stuff and I expressed to the company that I can’t just show up to work with all of my belongings and got ignored at first. Then their bright solution was to put me on the travel team and cut my pay down from 18 to 12 and get myself from Indiana to idaho. Flights are very expensive so cheapest ticket I could find was in Illinois. I drove 3 hours there and paid 295 for my flight. My flight had gotten switched when I got to the airport (not my control) and I wouldn’t be able to make it to my shift on time that night because my plane landed in Boise around midnight. I emailed them I should still be compensated for my trip and they said nope! So I didn’t rush off the plane and go straight to work , I had to get an Uber from the airport and find a hotel for myself the first night. I spent money I did not have and they helped with nothing at all. I eventually got them to help with the hotel where the initial email said I can’t choose help that’ll exceed my weekly per diem . Well ms petty said it can’t exceed my daily per diem and then I called HR finally to ask some questions and complain and got told that because of my attendance issues that they can do whatever they want when it comes to exceeding daily or weekly per diem and that I’d have the help taken out of my future checks. So that was stressful and annoying. So my first week was very rocky out here in idaho with the Ubers to and from work and etc. the handbook said they can help with rentals but they said they don’t when I asked about it. So the first check I received out here was $51 dollars and I was expected to provide my own place to stay and transportation to and from work for a whole week which was a joke! So I did not go to work and told them that I need to speak with a higher higher up because that was crazy m. Two days later they tell me I’m fired and that I missed work cus I was”too tired from flying “ which wasn’t the case at all and on my final check they took everything! I’m not stranded in idaho a place I’ve never been before with no money at all . I have no help or no anyone here and I told them I’ll do something about it and they asked me to cease and desist talking to a at the company cus they know they’re dead wrong. I’m 22 and never been in my own like that before and I don’t know anything about IDAHO so there will be something done about it because it’s not right! Do no screw yourself over and work for them nobody should have to go through what I’ve been going through I’m struggling because of them I’ve spent about 3000 dollars with this job and barely have made 1000 I’m baffled and down bad! Any help or suggestions?! #jobsearch #merchandiser #travel #scam #help #TAB #stranded

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Bonnie Brickan
over 6 months ago

Anyone else getting contacted from call centers that may be located in other countries? The first one was strange because it sounded like they were reading key words from my resume. When I advised them they are trying to match me to ill fitting position, she then asked me “Don’t you want to commute Mon-Fri from California (where I reside) to Michigan and come home weekends?” What? Anyway since then I get calls from the same type of callers. All the recruiters have accents from the country India. They text and email while your being contacted. One company that called was from crowdstaffing.com which is a sub company of Zenith Talent Company. When you go to either one of these sites it’s for job recruiters only. There’s no place for applicants to submit or perform job search. I Google above companies and I see mixed reviews and such.

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Chuck Sclafani
over 6 months ago

BE VERY AWARE OF JOB OPPORTUNITY SCAMS! HERE IS AN EMAIL AND PHONE NUMBER TIED TO THIS SCAM THAT I RECEIVED THIS MORNING:

Greetings After applying for our job posting posted on Dice job site for the Data Entry Clerk We feel you may be a good candidate for a position within our company, and hereby You have been selected for an online screening with the Hr manager Mrs Wendy Hoad

Organization Name: ASC GROUP (PTY) Limited

Job Title:Data Entry Clerk

You are required to set up a Google Hangout account, after this process, you are to add the Hiring Manager on your Google Hangout, her Gmail address is (ascrecruitdesk@gmail.com) add her to your Google Hangout buddy list ASAP for the job briefing and comprehensive details. If you don't have one , You're advised to setup the Google G-mail Account via (www.gmail.com) and download the Google hangout on your phone or PC via (www.google.com/hangouts) , she will be online waiting to respond to your add request as well as your messages. If you have any problem in setting up the Google Hangout account, Log into your Gmail account, at the bottom left-hand corner,click the Hangouts icon. If the time is not convenient for you, feel free to email her at this Email address: (ascrecruitdesk@gmail.com)

Your verification code is (HZIP-5330), this would serve as your identification number throughout the online hiring process.

She will be waiting to talk to you right away.Your timely response matter a lot. I wish you best of luck.

Best regards, Human Resources. ASC GROUP (PTY) Limited

The phone number tied to this bunko-artist: 218-331-1637 - person's name is MAURICE BROWN

#SCAM #JOBSCAM

YOU HAVE BEEN WARNED!! LETS SHUT THESE SCAM ARTISTS DOWN!! #MakeAmericaGreatAgain

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Brandy Schofield
over 6 months ago

Came across a not-so-new type of job scam. Hurts my heart to see when someone does fall for something similar. The other day I had time to burn as I was awaiting a real call back from a job I had interviewed for a week ago so why not see where this all goes. But a person texts my phone from a weird out-of-state number saying that they saw my resume on the workintexas.com website from someone claiming the name Linda Esquibel. Figured I would see what it was about considering I am currently looking for a job to work from home.
They started off claiming that they worked for Omada Healthcare. Referring me to another hiring manager that claimed his name was Marco Franco user tag for discord: Marco Franco#1182 for anyone who gets a text or email from these people). Where the first red flag was "Hey do you have Discord?" Knowing that I do have an account, I promptly told them No to see what they were trying to do. Well needless to say they wanted to hold the interview via Discord chat (1st red flag). Used my alternate discord account to see how it would pan out. Needless to say, they were quick to respond and ask me several questions and give me their version of what the position would be that they felt I would be a great asset to them. At the end of the conversation when I grew tired of the bull that they were trying to feed, the guy got super aggressive with wanting me to give all my information (2nd red flag) as we are almost 30 minutes into me feeding into the bull. My counter to him asking was, well most hiring managers will refer back to the resume for the additional information that they are looking for. As far as my banking information, that is never asked during an interview let alone a privacy act violation so no I do not feel comfortable relating any of this information considering that would be an HR type of thing (3rd red flag).
In the end, told him I knew it was a scam and had seen this on a similar basis from another friend, blocked him, reported him to the Work Source, sent into the actual company addressing that a scammer was using the companies name. The Omada company did get back to me and told me that there have been a lot of recent scams in their name. People have told them that the scammers are asking for money for equipment or sending a bogus check for the unfortunate soul to put in their account and then wipe them of all their funds.
Be aware that interviews are not done through any messenger apps and if they do interview you it will be through a secure online portal that they will send you through or the regular phone interview. But just in case someone else comes across something like this you have been updated on the new tactics they are trying to use to get money out of people. #scam #unemployed #jobscam

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Michael Carvalho
over 6 months ago

The FTC has issued this notice regarding people who are trying to scam others when looking for employment.

Linked-In Scammers advertise jobs the same way legitimate employers do — online (in ads, on job sites, and social media), in newspapers, and sometimes on TV and radio. They promise you a job, but what they want is your money and your personal information. Here are some examples of jobs scams and tips to help you avoid them. Examples of Job Scams How to Avoid a Job Scam Tips for Finding a Job What to Do If You Paid a Scammer Report Job Scams to the FTC Examples of Job Scams

Work-from-home job scams Many people would like to work from home and generate income. Scammers know this, so they place ads, often online, claiming that they have jobs where you can make thousands of dollars a month working from home with little time and effort. The job could be anything from reshipping products to selling things to people you know. Sometimes the scammers try to get you interested by saying that you can be your own boss, start your own business, or set your own schedule.

But instead of making money, you end up paying for starter kits, “training,” or certifications that are useless. You might also find that your credit card is charged without your permission, or you get caught up in a fake check scam. If someone offers you a job and they claim that you can make a lot of money in a short period of time and with little work, that’s a scam.

Here are some examples of work-from-home job scams: Reshipping scams. If you’re searching for a job online, you might see positions advertised for quality control managers or virtual personal assistants that have been placed by scammers. But here’s how you can tell it’s a scam: once you’re “hired,” the company says that your “job” is to receive packages at home, discard the original packaging and receipts, repackage the products, and then reship them to an address they give you.

Sometimes the address is overseas. The products are often high-priced goods, like name-brand electronics, bought using stolen credit cards. Reshipping goods is never a real job. That’s simply being part of a scam. Sometimes the company tells you it will send your first paycheck after you work for a month, but the paycheck never arrives. And when you try to contact the company, you’ll find that the phone number is no longer connected and the website is deactivated. This “job” is a scam, and if you gave your personal information thinking it was for payroll, you may now have an identity theft problem.

Reselling merchandise scams. In this scam, you may get a call out of the blue from a stranger offering you a job opportunity. Or you may see an ad online or in your local newspaper. In either case, they say that you can make money buying brand-name luxury products for less than retail prices, then selling those products for a profit. But after you pay for the products, the package never arrives or, if it does, it’s full of junk. Nanny, caregiver, and virtual personal assistant job scams Scammers post fake job ads for nannies, caregivers, and virtual assistants on job sites. Or they may send emails that look like they’re from someone in your community, or who is part of an organization you know, like your college or university. If you apply, the person who hires you might send you a check. They’ll tell you to keep part of the money for your services and then send the rest to someone else. That is a scam. A legitimate employer will never ask you to do that. What happens next is that the check is fake. It can take weeks for a bank to discover this, but once they do, the bank will want you to repay that full amount. So: if you get an offer that includes depositing a check and then using some of the money for any reason, that’s a scam. Walk away.

Mystery shopper scams Getting paid to shop sounds like a dream job — especially if you’re going to school full-time or looking for a side job. But while some mystery shopping jobs are legitimate, many are scams. Legitimate mystery shopping companies won’t ask you to pay for certifications, directories of jobs, or job guarantees. If someone asks you to pay to get a job, that’s a scam. And if they want you to deposit a check and send money back, stop. That’s a sign of a fake check scam. Read Mystery Shopper Scams to learn more.

Job placement service scams While many staffing agencies, temporary agencies, headhunters, and other placement firms are legitimate, others lie about what they will do for you, promote outdated or fake job openings, and charge fees for so-called services. Legitimate placement firms do not typically charge a fee. Instead, the hiring company pays them a fee to find qualified candidates. If a placement firm asks you for a fee, walk away. You could be dealing with a scam.

Government and postal jobs scams You respond to an ad that promises jobs with the federal government or postal service. But then you have to pay a fee to get the job, or pay for study materials so you’ll get a high score on the postal exam. Those are scams. Information about job openings with the federal government or U.S. Postal Service is free and available to everyone. And it’s free to apply for a federal or postal job. Find and apply for a job with the federal government at USAJobs.gov, or visit usps.com/employment to find jobs with the U.S. Postal Service.

How to Avoid a Job Scam

Before you accept a job offer, and certainly before you pay for one, take these steps to protect yourself from job scams:

Do an online search. Look up the name of the company or the person who’s hiring you, plus the words “scam,” “review,” or “complaint.” You might find out they’ve scammed other people. Talk to someone you trust. Describe the offer to them. What do they think? This also helps give you vital time to think about the offer. Don't pay for the promise of a job. Legitimate employers, including the federal government, will never ask you to pay to get a job. Anyone who does is a scammer. Never bank on a “cleared” check. No legitimate potential employer will ever send you a check and then tell you to send on part of the money, or buy gift cards with it. That’s a fake check scam. The check will bounce, and the bank will want you to repay the amount of the fake check. Tips for Finding a Job

When you’re searching for a job, use safe and reliable sources. Here are a few places to start: USAJobs.gov — This is the federal government’s official site with job openings nationwide. CareerOneStop — Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Labor, CareerOneStop lists hundreds of thousands of jobs. It also links to employment and training programs in each state. USA.gov — Find local government websites, which list any open positions they may have on their websites. Also, when you’re applying for a job, an employer may do a background check. Read Background Checks to learn more.

What to Do if You Paid a Scammer

No matter how you paid — debit or credit card, bank or wire transfer, gift card, or cash reload card — immediately contact the company you used to send the money, report the fraud, and ask to have the transaction reversed, if possible. For specific advice and tips on how to reverse different types of payments, read What to Do If You Were Scammed.

Report Job Scams to the FTC

If you see or lose money to a job scam, report it to the FTC at ReportFraud.ftc.gov. You can also report it to your state attorney general.

Find out more about how to avoid scams at ftc.gov/scams.

Tagged with: #scam #jobsearch

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