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Patrick Coppedge
over 6 months ago

List Job Skills Creatively On Your Resume

With the competition in the job market increasing for job seekers, it is crucial to grab the attention of the hiring manager if your resume has a chance. Employers are looking for resumes that showcase high quality skills and rich field experiences. To create a resume that stands out from the other candidates' resumes, focus on format and word choice.

A job candidate's skills and relevant knowledge are substantiated by the keywords they choose to use. Industry-specific core skills will enable a job candidate to successfully pass through an applicant tracking system (ATS), which is utilized by the majority of companies today to obtain the right candidates.

Each resume should be specific to the job you are applying for. You can easily locate the keywords a company is focused on by looking at the requirements listed for the job. If you have knowledge of, or experience using certain software programs listed in the job description, include them on your resume to draw employers' attention.

Simply highlighting keywords, however, is not enough to make your resume stand out. Due to the recent shift in resume trends, no longer are resumes merely a listing of jobs and duties. They are truly promotional materials. As such, it is no longer enough to say that you are a creative, motivational problem-solver. You need to demonstrate it. The challenge is greater for those who have been laid off or who have been out of work for an extended period of time. For these professionals, the task of proving that their skills are relevant can be more difficult than it is for other job seekers.

Job seekers need to add transferable skills that they've gained from paid and unpaid past experiences to their resumes. Transferable skills acquired during any activity from volunteer positions, classes, projects, parenting, hobbies and sports can be applicable to one's next job. By adding transferable skills to a resume, employers get a better understanding and broader picture of who they are hiring as well as the interests, values and experiences that the candidate brings to the table.

The idea is to explain your skills and experiences in a way that highlights any gains. Be specific and provide relevant statistics wherever you can. Revenue wins, client growth, and budget savings are easy to quantify and are impressive on your resume. Here are a few categories of skills you could include on your resume, along with unique ways to express them.

Interpersonal Communication

Jobs require teamwork. There will be constant exchanges with co-workers, and discussing and sharing ideas with supervisors. Employers want to know the level of communication skills you have and how well you work with others. The specific skills required will vary based on your position. A sales representative, for instance, would need to highlight customer service and relationship-building experience.

On your resume: writes clearly and concisely, listens attentively, negotiates/resolves differences, provides and asks for feedback, offers well-thought-out solutions, cooperates and works well with others, thrives in a collaborative environment.

Planning And Organization

If the job you want involves working on research projects and companywide campaigns, you want to show off your top-notch planning abilities. "Organization skills" may sound like an overused filler term, but those skills are the ones that will help you succeed. Show potential employers you've got what they're looking for by outlining your involvement in, and results from, current and previous projects.

On your resume: identifies and gathers appropriate resources, thoroughly researches background information, develops strategies, thinks critically to solve problems, coordinates and completes tasks, manages projects effectively, meets deadlines.

Management And Leadership

Although it may not always be easy to express them on a resume, management and leadership skills can be gained in a variety of conventional and unconventional ways.

Demonstrating your management abilities on paper requires you to think about what it is you do best as a leader and how you guide your fellow assiciates toward success. To give employers a better idea of what you've accomplished, discuss the size of the team and the scope of the projects you manage.

On your resume: teaches/trains/instructs, counsels/coaches, manages conflict, helps team members set and achieve goals, delegates effectively, makes and implements decisions, oversees projects.

Social Media

Social media is one of the most desired skills in a variety of job fields. Socially active organizations are more likely to attract top talent, drive new sales leads and better engage customers. Therefore, when employers look for new hires, they're also typically looking for new internal-brand ambassadors.

For positions directly involving work on corporate social media campaigns, hiring managers look for concrete numbers and metrics, including web traffic, audience reach and overall engagement.

On your resume: manages social media campaigns, measures and analyzes campaign results, identifies and connects with industry influencers, sparks social conversation within the brand's community, creates and executes content strategies, drives engagement and leads, enhances brand image through social presence.

Follow Me For Weekly Informative Articles Patrick Coppedge

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Edmond Bremang
over 6 months ago

I was assisting my client in the appointment, checking blood sugar, medication and helping my client to bath and changing diapers. playing with clients

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Omar Medeiros
over 6 months ago

What do employers consider to be reliable transportation? I see this question frequently asked on applications but I don’t know if managers want to know if I own a car or if I can get to the job on time. I don’t have a car right now but the bus system around my house and in the city gets me pretty much wherever I need to go. Would it be misleading on an application if I answer Yes or disqualify me from a job #interview if I tell them I don’t own my own car?

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Steven Ransom
over 6 months ago

When was the last time you overhauled your resume? As an older, more experienced job hunter, it’s not enough to simply change a few dates and descriptions when you start looking for a new position. The resume style and design that got you in the door years ago can make you look downright prehistoric now.

It’s tough enough out there already: Unemployed job hunters age 55 to 64 spend a median of 34.5 weeks looking for work, vs 22.2 weeks for workers of all ages, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reports. And in a recent AARP survey of workers 45 and older, three-quarters cited age discrimination as a reason they weren’t confident they could find a new job in short order. To make sure you don’t look like a dinosaur in your field, don’t make these eight mistakes on your resume.

Mistake No. 1: The format is tired and dull An old fashioned, black-and-white resume won’t cut it anymore, says Louise Kursmark, executive resume writer and co-author of Modernize Your Resume.

Christopher Ward, the co-founder of Myer Resumes, agrees: “Society is becoming more visual.”

To give your resume a modern look, add a splash of color to the section headings or incorporate a colorful personal logo. Instead of using Times New Roman, pick a contemporary font like Calibri, Cambria, Palatino, or Verdana—all of which are standard typefaces, so they’ll translate just fine between operating systems. But stick to one font. Also, leave some white space on the page to make your resume easier to read, suggests Kursmark.

Mistake No. 2: You list every job you’ve ever had Your resume is a way to sell yourself to employers, not your complete biography. “Recounting unrelated experience from the distant past is a surefire way to make your resume seem dated,” says Scott Vedder, a Fortune 100 recruiter and author of Signs of a Great Resume. “There’s no law of resumes that says you must include every job you’ve ever had.” As a general guideline, only highlight jobs from the past 10 to 15 years. The caveat? “Include a quick nod to a job from long ago when it relates to the opportunity you’re pursuing,” says Vedder.

For example, skip your fast food job in college, but, he adds, “an application for an HR role at a major food and beverage outlet may be well-served by referencing prior experience in the field.”

Mistake No. 3: You brag of skills that are passé Employers are looking for professionals who keep their skills fresh. “Stating you’re proficient on software or a program that is no longer commonly used probably isn’t relevant in today’s market,” says Vedder. The same applies to soft skills, such as “leadership” or “problem solver.” Employers should be able to glean that you possess them from your work experience. And don’t list obvious skills or software, like Microsoft Word. Use the skills section of your resume to highlight proficiencies that show you’re current with industry trends. So, for example, if you’re in sales, you’d want to include Salesforce or other up-to-date software on your resume. Not sure what’s in demand today? Scour job listings for the skills employers are singling out.

Mistake No. 4: Your email address is vintage 1990s “It’s ridiculous to think something as innocuous as aol.com at the top of the resume will knock you out of the running, without further consideration, but there is a chance that it might,” says Dawn Bugni, a professional resume writer in Atkinson, N.C. “Is it fair? No. Does it happen? Yes.” Instead of using your Hotmail or AOL address from the 90s, upgrade to a Gmail account.

Mistake No. 5: You make employers work to reach you Hyperlinking your email address will make it easier for hiring managers to contact you for an interview. Plus, include a link to your LinkedIn profile and any other social media accounts that you use professionally (read: not your personal Facebook page). That’ll save a prospective employer from having to search for you online. Pro tip: Create a customized LinkedIn URL to reduce clutter on the page, Ward recommends. (Go to your profile page, then follow directions under “Edit public profile & URL.”)

Mistake No. 6: You highlight a career objective Still sporting an objective at the top of your resume? Get rid of it, says Bugni.

Rather than leading with what you’re looking for in a job, focus on your prospective employer’s needs by writing a career summary instead. This section should explain, briefly (think roughly 50 words), what skills and experience you bring to the table, and how you’ll add value to the company. It should also have a headline describing your profession and level of experience.

Mistake No. 7: You call attention to your age Although the Age Discrimination in Employment Act prohibits employment discrimination against persons 40 years or older, plenty of 50-plus workers sense that it can be a problem. Many job seekers make the mistake of revealing their age by including their college graduation date on their resume, says Ward. The best approach is to simply leave it off. That may not solve the problem, of course. In AARP’s survey, 44% of respondents who had applied for a new job in the past two years reported being asked their age or graduation year.

Mistake No. 8: You state the obvious Including the phrase “references available upon request” on a resume used to be commonplace. Not today. Potential employers expect you to be able to provide references. You don’t need to waste space on your resume saying so.

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Carey Thomas
over 6 months ago

Needing advice on how to get jobs in similar trades based on the limited training I recently received in plumbing trade , and direct me to any union provided apprenticeship programs, plse and thnk you.

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Tomas Solis
over 6 months ago

Good company we did a lot of work commercial and residential schools work

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Heather Smith
over 6 months ago

I am 49 and this is only the second time I’ve been unemployed since I was 14 years old. I have had 1-3 jobs at a time. I feel like I’m not wanted and I know I’ve only been off 4 weeks but gosh. I was a nurse for many many years and I let my license go when I became a dental assistant becuz I figured that would be my forever job. I did on the job training for the assistant position and I was terminated for taking too much time off while my adult daughter had pregnancy issues with her twins. Anyhow I have applied at over 40 places in two states and have only had one interview . I can’t go back to nursing because I would need to go back to school to reobtain my LPN....I was a manager of a Pizza Hut prior to the dental assistant job and that literally is all I have to stand on now.... I’m just really frustrated and it’s hard to stay positive when the bills are flowing in.

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Stephany Aguilera
over 6 months ago

Hi. My name is Stephany. I am seeking a job. I’m a recent graduate from California State University Channel Islands, with a Bachelor’s degree in Early Childhood Studies. I don’t have work experience, but the type of experience I have is being a student teacher with toddlers and preschool children. Also, I have some volunteer experience in working with preschool children and preschool children with special needs. I’m willing to work any type of job and can learn the skills needed to be learned for the job. #qualifications

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Melissa Carrington
over 6 months ago

I'm relatively new to this site, so guidance would be helpful. I have been in all aspects of nursing for 20+ years. I want to change what I do. How do I get employers to give me a chance to show what I can do? I am so much more than nursing.

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