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Gary Orosco
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over 6 months ago
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Samuel Haskin
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over 6 months ago

“So, what have you been doing since you left your last job?” Anyone who’s been out of a job for a long period of time understands how stressful it feels when you nervously have to ponder your brain to find legitimate response to this question during a long awaited job interview. Inconsistent employment activity on your application immediately raises a reg flag to managers and often times results as a deal breaker towards getting hired is you don't address it properly.

I endured many similar moments of anxiety when I was trying to bounce back into a full time job after the 2008 recession. I lost my job almost immediately after the housing bubble burst and suddenly found myself job hopping from gig to gig to avoid losing everything. Landscaping, dog walking, ditch digging, seasonal, per diem, as long as it was legal you name it… I did it.

After 2012 when the economy finally started showing signs of recovery I decided it was time to go back out and look for a full-time career job again. It took a lot of career counseling and resume editing to make myself stand out as a halfway decent job applicant again but I eventually landed another career job that I continue to enjoy today.

Anyway, here are three points that helps me get back on my feet after a long time of unemployment.

#FunctionalIsBetter! Functional style resumes highlight your skills rather than your dates. Managers are probably going to give your resume a 6-10 second review anyway so why not show them what you can do first.

#StopProcrastinating! Volunteer, take a class, or learn a new skill. These activities probably won't pay the bills but a few hours a week makes explaining how you spent time off a heck of alot easier.

#KeepItReal! When it comes down to it honesty is always the best policy. Don’t get yourself twisted up into a situation you can’t free yourself from later. Interviewers are human beings too and understand life happens. Keep your responses brief, on point, and positive.

This is a major pain point for lot’s of people out there still unemployed so anyone willing to share more advice and/or suggestions is welcome to comment. Thanks

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